Tuesday, May 11, 2010

I got nuthin...

One of those blank days here..rain and gray..


Hey..wait..I LIKE those gray days..

So, is it "grAy" or "grEy"?

"Grey became the established British spelling in the 20th century, pace Dr. Johnson and others[128], and it is but a minor variant in American English, according to dictionaries. Canadians tend to prefer grey. The non-cognate greyhound was never grayhound. Both Grey and Gray are found in proper names everywhere in the English-speaking world. Americans tend to use "gray" in reference to the color and "grey" as the adjective"

huh...

And, what does "ruthless" really mean? I know what the definition is, but if someone is bad, or silly, or mean..they are said to be..ruthless..

Sooo, is the opposite that, you know, a person is good and serious and nice.. full of ruth?



What the heck is that?? "oh, you are such ruthful people.."

***I l.o.v.e this interwebby-thingy! Look what I found:

Did you know?

"Ruthless" can be defined as "without ruth" or "having no ruth." So what, then, is ruth? The noun "ruth," which is now considerably less common than "ruthless," means "compassion for the misery of another," "sorrow for one's own faults," or "remorse." And, just as it is possible for one to be without ruth, it is also possible to be full of ruth. The antonym of "ruthless" is "ruthful," meaning "full of ruth" or "tender." "Ruthful" can also mean "full of sorrow" or "causing sorrow." "Ruth" can be traced back to the Middle English noun "ruthe," itself from "ruen," meaning "to rue" or "to feel regret, remorse, or sorrow.

Yeah, I've wondered about that because one of my silly-fun-favorite old movies is ..wouldn't you know it..

"Ruthless People"...


 
huh.....

I better go to bed before I start thinking again..

-me

10 comments:

diane said...

It must be fun living with your brain there is never a dull moment. Sad to hear that it is a GREY day. I hope all those you meet tomorrow will be full of ruth. We had a lot of fun when Bill was learning English. He once said if you have one "foot" and two "feet" why don't you say one "shoop" and two "sheep".

Emmy said...

Wow! Just, wow! That was really fun :) I'm an American, but I prefer to use grEy as both the color and adjective. And I was thrilled with the Middle English references for ruthe, since I'm an English Major with an interest in origin of the language :)

Karen said...

I just sent that definition of "ruth" to my sister-in-law....Ruth.

Sweet Repose said...

OK, now my head hurts...

Luv you, ol' crazy one of ruth!!!

Lucy said...

And I thought I was the only one on the planet who never knew if it was grey or gray. Ly lie lain and laid always get me too. I never know. Which is right when. And then there's......aww forget it. It's starting to hurt my brain.

Artistic Accents by Darla said...

I agree with diane! Your brain is a happy, fun place!! So glad you share your thoughts with us!! It's TOO fun!

Sue said...

I love the inter-webby thing too - I find I usually learn something new everyday....I never knew the meaning of 'ruth' (hee, sounds like a story from the bible).

Hugs,

Sue

Vee said...

Now I thought you were going to dedicate this to a dear friend named Ruth. I don't know how you get to sleep at night with such a creative mind!

Melinda Cornish said...

my name isnt Ruth, so does that mean I am ruthless?
Also, on the subject of grey or gray....how about color or colour? I always think about things like this too....it is better than thinking about things like, I dont know...housework?

Vicki said...

you are just getting so educated! And now I am too cause I came to visit (o: